Elizabeth’s preborn baby leaps at the presence of Mary’s baby
Elizabeth’s preborn baby leaps at the presence of Mary’s baby

Although Christmas celebrations focus on the manger, the miracle of the Incarnation did not happen in Bethlehem. The “Word became flesh” not at the time of the virgin birth, but when Jesus was conceived in Mary’s womb, as heralded by the angel Gabriel.

The value of human life in the womb is key to the way this account is told in the Bible. The Greek word which refers to a preborn baby in Luke 1:41 is the exact same word used for newborn Jesus in Luke 2:12, as he lay in the manger. There is no difference (except that one was seen, and the other was unseen).

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Gates of Hell

BIBLICAL HISTORY AND MODERN REALITY

When Jesus spoke of Hell, He is usually quoted as having used the word “Gehenna,” which referred to the notorious place where children were sacrificed, with the innocent blood shed in this place desecrating this land for generations to come.

 

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“When wicked people choose to burn their children in the fires of Gehenna, God promises to avenge the innocent blood of these children by burning their murderers in those same fires. So the relevance of the Gates of Hell to our Abortion Holocaust should now be quite obvious.”

 

Jesus offers a hand up to the woman caught in adultery
The way Jesus treated the woman who was caught in adultery is a powerful example of grace in action. But all too often we hesitate to follow Jesus’ powerful words.

A scriptural understanding of “grace” leads us to higher standards (surpassing our limitations and exceeding even our abilities), but often it seems that the practical impact of teaching “grace” is to lower the standards for our behavior. What have we been missing?

When Jesus showered grace upon the adulterous woman, rescuing her from being stoned, he nevertheless refused to ignore her sin, commanding her to “go and sin no more.”

But “sin no more” is not a statement of condemnation – it is one of the most powerful statements of grace and hope in the Bible. We don’t need to continue to eat pig slop, because our Father is waiting to eagerly welcome us home. If we refuse to mention “guilt” or “sin,” we may think we are showing grace, but we are actually stealing grace, leaving people to wallow in the mud with the pigs.

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